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DOCUMENTS 

12=1968 





INTRODUCTION 



San Francisco International Airport, municipally owned by the City and County 
of San Francisco, is operated as a department under the jurisdiction of the City's 
Public Utilities Commission. 



Located in San Mateo County, between Bayshore Freeway and San Francisco 
Bay, it is approximately 14 miles and 20 minutes travel time from downtown San 
Francisco. 

The Airport began operations in mid-1927 on 155 acres of leased pasture lands. 
Known as Mills Field, it offered a 1,700 foot graded dirt landing strip as a runway 
and a frame farmhouse type structure with less than 3,000 square feet of area 
housed administration and operation offices as well as a weather observation 
facility. 

Today, four decades later, San Francisco International Airport is the fourth busiest 
in the United States — and ranks fifth in the Free World — in terms of passengers 
and air cargo volumes. During those 40 years, the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, airlines, and other Airport tenants have invested approximately $220 million 
to meet the ever-changing requirements of the mushrooming commercial aviation 
industry. 

It is anticipated that investments of an equal, or even larger sum will be necessary 
within the forthcoming decade to meet new and greater challenges resulting from 
the "jumbo" subsonic and the supersonic jetliners. 



(Top photo on cover is aerial 
view of present air passenger 
terminal complex at San Fran- 
cisco International Airport. Pho- 
to below is architectural draw- 
ing of passenger terminal area 
as proposed for about 1972.) 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04180 0583 



To some people, especially taxpayers, it is a gigantic capital investment. To some WHAT IS AN AIRPORT? 

neighbors it can be noisy at times. To airliner pilots, it often appears to be a 

postage stamp size parcel of ground on which to land a 600-mile-an-hour jetliner 

weighing nearly 150 tons. To airlines it can be the reason for too many delayed 

take-offs and landings. And to the air traveler it frequently is the beginning, or the 

end, of a long drive through heavy highway traffic. 

The real purpose of an airport is to serve as an elaborate transfer point between 
two vastly different forms of transportation — the airplane in its many sizes on one 
hand, and on the other the varied types of ground transportation whether automo- 




D00UMBHT9 



i key to the economic well-being of a community 
' or indirectly — sources of employment by being 
istry and other commercial enterprises requiring 
»n with the rest of the nation — or the free world. 



ECONOMIC FACTORS 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



er for all of Northern California and portions of 
regon, San Francisco International Airport serves 
lan those of more than 44 individual states of the 



COMMERCIAL AIR HUB 



it, it is a formidable force in the economy of the 
? 25,000 persons are employed on the Airport and 
imated in excess of $200,000,000. From five to 
; Bay Area, with a gross yearly payroll of nearly 
to activities of airlines and other Airport tenants, 
mt 31,000 jobs with a payroll of approximately 
Not to be taken from the Library is a San Francisco International Airport. 

circling range and can carry up to 250 passengers, 
all-cargo configuration. The passengers and cargo 
Airport are the nucleus around which a vast net- 
.tm» yji iraaicu muusiiiai activities has been developed. Our Airport is such a 
vital link in the Bay Area economy, that commercial aviation ranks right at the 
top of today's basic regional industries. 

And many scores of other major industries throughout the nine-county Bay Begion 
rely in varying degrees on air transportation for the successful conduct of business. 
Commercial aviation, as an industry, is relatively young. It was only 40 years ago 
that Mills Field, the forerunner of San Francisco International Airport, began 
operating. 

But in those four decades the growth of commercial aviation has been so enormous 
that its real impact on the local economy is not fully recognized. 

Many area residents are unaware of aviation's contribution to their economic well- 
being. And few communities as a whole recognize the extent of their reliance on 
air transportation and related activities. 

A recent survey seeking to bring into sharp focus the vital importance of aviation 
activities at our Airport to the San Francisco Bay Begion's economy reveals the 
following: 



REFERENCE 
BOOK 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04180 0583 



To some people, especially taxpayers, it is a gigantic capital investment. To some 
neighbors it can be noisy at times. To airliner pilots, it often appears to be a 
postage stamp size parcel of ground on which to land a 600-mile-an-hour jetliner 
weighing nearly 150 tons. To airlines it can be the reason for too many delayed 
take-offs and landings. And to the air traveler it frequently is the beginning, or the 
end, of a long drive through heavy highway traffic. 

The real purpose of an airport is to serve as an elaborate transfer point between 
two vastly different forms of transportation — the airplane in its many sizes on one 
hand, and on the other the varied types of ground transportation whether automo- 
bile, bus, truck, or train. 



WHAT IS AN AIRPORT? 



In most instances an airport is a key to the economic well-being of a community ECONOMIC FACTORS 
or region. It provides — directly or indirecdy — sources of employment by being 
the magnet which attracts industry and other commercial enterprises requiring 
speed and ease in communication with the rest of the nation — or the free world. 



As the commercial aviation center for all of Northern California and portions of COMMERCIAL AIR HUB 
Western Nevada and Southern Oregon, San Francisco International Airport serves 
an area and population greater than those of more than 44 individual states of the 
United States. 

As a major center of employment, it is a formidable force in the economy of the 
San Francisco Bay Region. Some 25,000 persons are employed on the Airport and 
have a gross annual payroll estimated in excess of $200,000,000. From five to 
seven thousand other jobs in the Bay Area, with a gross yearly payroll of nearly 
$50,000,000 are directly related to activities of airlines and other Airport tenants. 
These add up to a total of about 31,000 jobs with a payroll of approximately 
$250,000,000 — all because there is a San Francisco International Airport. 

Modern jet aircraft have a globe-circling range and can carry up to 250 passengers, 
or 100,000 pound pay load in an all-cargo configuration. The passengers and cargo 
they transport in and out of the Airport are the nucleus around which a vast net- 
work of related industrial activities has been developed. Our Airport is such a 
vital link in the Bay Area economy, that commercial aviation ranks right at the 
top of today's basic regional industries. 

And many scores of other major industries throughout the nine-county Bay Region 
rely in varying degrees on air transportation for the successful conduct of business. 
Commercial aviation, as an industry, is relatively young. It was only 40 years ago 
that Mills Field, the forerunner of San Francisco International Airport, began 
operating. 

But in those four decades the growth of commercial aviation has been so enormous 
that its real impact on the local economy is not fully recognized. 

Many area residents are unaware of aviation's contribution to their economic well- 
being. And few communities as a whole recognize the extent of their reliance on 
air transportation and related activities. 

A recent survey seeking to bring into sharp focus the vital importance of aviation 
activities at our Airport to the San Francisco Bay Region's economy reveals the 
following: 



D REF 387.736 Fll 97 



Facts about San 
Francisco International 




EMPLOYMENT More than 30,000 Bay Area residents earn an estimated $250,000,000 annually in 
jobs directly related to air transportation at San Francisco International Airport, 
the area's most rapidly growing industry. 

Employments at the Airport at the first of 1967 totaled at least 25,000 with an 
annual payroll in excess of $200,000,000. 

Airlines and supporting services employ another 2,500 persons with a yearly pay- 
roll of some $15,000,000 off the Airport. And close to 4,000 additional jobs with a 
payroll approximating $30,000,000 have a direct connection to generation of air 
traffic. These include sales, promotional and clerical personnel of nearly 50 airlines 
with offices in the Bay Area but which do not offer service from SFIA; air cargo 
services; travel agencies; industry traffic departments; drayage and/or trucking 
companies; workers in the hotel/motel complex developed adjacent to the Airport, 
and a variety of supporting services. 



JOB GAINS Increases in employment and payroll totals on the Airport in recent years are a 
clear representation of the aviation industry's expansion in the Bay Area. In 1955 
the job total was 11,000 with a gross annual payroll of $55,000,000. For 1960, the 
figures were 14,500 and $100,000,000; at the end of 1965, 20,000 and $165,000,000. 
And for the first of 1967, 25,000.and $200,000, an increase of approximately 25 per 
cent in just little more than a year. 



3 1223 04180 0583 

ftr PI SBLIC LIBRARY 



PLACES OF RESIDENCE 



PAYROLL 




Federal Bureau of Labor index figures for family expenditures indicate the $250,- HOW PAYROLLS 
000,000 gross annual payroll of the aviation industry as related to SFIA is spent as ARE SPENT 
follows: 



Taxes $ 33,500,000.00 

Food and beverages 54,125,000.00 

Tobacco products 2,813,750.00 

Housing (shelter, utilities, furnishings, appliances, etc.) 61,702,500.00 

Clothing (includes materials, services, etc.) 20,567,750.00 

Personal care 5,629,000.00 

Medical care 16,670,500.00 

Recreation 9,959,000.00 

Automobiles ( purchases and operation ) 34,207,000.00 

Other transportation 4,113,500.00 

Miscellaneous 6,712,000.00 

Total $250,000,000.00 



The City and County of San Francisco, the airlines and other tenants have an CAPITAL INN ES I MI \ I S 
investment at the Airport in excess of $220,000,000. Additionally, the airlines have 
invested more than $6,000,000 in San Francisco, principally for ticketing, sales, and 
administrative facilities. 



San Mateo County and its political subdivisions are paid nearly $5,000,000 annually T WIS 
in real and personal property taxes by the Airport, the airlines and other tenants 
Additionally, an estimated $10,000 per month in fines and bail forfeitures for traffic 
violations on the Airport go into the county's coffers. 



WHERE WORKERS LIVE Residences of employees in the aviation industry, related activities and supporting 

services are: 





Workers at 


Total 


Place 


Airport 


Employees 


San r rnnri <;pr» 




7 =.99 


Brisbane 


1 2fi 


158 


Daly City 


438 


^48 


South San Francisco 


937 


1,172 


Pacifica 


781 


976 






2,113 


Millbrae 


637 


796 


Burlingame 


1,312 


1,640 


San Mateo 


2,937 


3,671 


South San Mateo County 


4,269 


5,336 


Other ( Santa Clara County and 




North and East Bay Areas ) 


5,852 


7,318 


Totals 


25,000 


31,250 



According to the national average of 3.2 persons per family, and one worker per 
family, the 25,000 persons employed at the Airport represent a population of 
80,000, more than that of any San Mateo County city with the exception of San 
Mateo. 




According to our recent survey, the approximate payroll totals for individual areas INCOME BY CITIES 
are: 



Place 

San Francisco 

Brisbane 

Daly City 

South San Francisco 

Pacifica 

San Bruno 

Millbrae 

Burlingame 

San Mateo 

Southern San Mateo County 

Other ( Santa Clara County, North and 
East Bay Areas, etc. ) 

Totals 



Airport 


Total 


$ 48,144,750.00 


$ 60,180,937 


1,039,500.00 


1,263^000 


3,503,500.00 


4^379^375 


7,496,500.00 


9,370,625 


6,248,250.00 


7,810,312 


13,517,500.00 


16,896,875 


K OQft Kf\f\ on 

D,uyo,ouu.uu 


o,o/u,ozo 


10,496,500.00 


13,120,625 


23,496,500.00 


29,370,625 


34,151,750.00 


42,689,750 


46,808,750.00 


58,547,312 


$200,000,000.00 


$250,000,000 



San Mateo County residents compose approximately 54 per cent of the work force 
at the Airport. This figures out at 13,130 and indicates the wages and salaries paid 
at $108,000,000, more than 10 per cent of the estimated $915,658,000 payroll total 
estimated for the county in 1966. 




ANNUAL AIR CARGO TONNAGE 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 




GOODS AND SERVICES Airlines and other airport tenants spend close to $100,000,000 yearly with Bay Area 

firms for goods and services necessary to their operations. Additionally, the airline 
purchases of aircraft fuel at SFIA in 1966 approached the $50,000,000 mark. 



OTHER BENEFITS Speedy, convenient and efficient transportation always has been a key factor in 

industrial and commercial success. San Francisco International Airport is such a 
key factor and has been the lure which has attracted scores of new industries to the 
Bay Area, particularly to San Mateo County and other Peninsula districts. 

The San Mateo County Development Association, a non-profit business and indus- 
trial development and promotional organization, reports San Mateo County has 
gained 2,568 new plants and /or expansions since 1955: These represent a total 
capital investment of almost $475,000,000. 

An association executive gives much credit to San Francisco International Airport 
for these gains. He says: "San Francisco International Airport has been a major 
contributing influence in the selection of San Mateo County sites for these plants 
and expansions." And he added: "We have full confidence that the Airport will 
continue to be a principal factor in the attraction of new industries and payrolls 
to San Mateo County in the future." 

An example of new businesses resulting directly from the Airport is the speedy 
expansion of the hotel/motel industry. During the last eight to nine years, the 
number of hotel/motel rooms or units near the Airport (from approximately 2M 
miles both North and South ) has increased from 152 to well over 2,000, represent- 
ing a capital investment in excess of $20,000,000, and providing many hundreds of 
jobs. 

The Airport also has been a paramount factor in the successful development of 
several industrial parks in Northern San Mateo County, and for the choice of sites 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

TOTAL IN AND OUT PASSENGERS PER YEAR 

(MILLIONS) 




'47 '50 



for the nation's second largest complex of electronics equipment plants along the 
Peninsula. These are places of employment for many thousands of skilled and 
professional workers. 



Although much criticism has been voiced nationally that proximity to the airport REAL ESTATE VALUES 
tends to depreciate real estate values, the reverse actually is true at San Francisco 
International Airport. Industrial and commercial lands are in much demand and 
most residential properties bring premium prices with an "extra premium" for 
homes having a "view of the Airport." 



A clear perspective of the almost phenomenal growth of San Francisco Inter- AIR TRAFFIC GROWTH 
national Airport in recent years is revealed by these figures: 

1955 1960 1965 

Air Passengers 3,085,422 5,131,024 9,071,084 

Air Freight (lbs.) 59,763,422 105,424,013 333,351,729 

The passenger gain from 1955 to 1960 was 76 per cent; from 1960 to 1965, 77 per 
cent, and for 1955 to 1965, 194 per cent. 

Air freight increased 76 per cent in the 1955-60 period; 216 per cent from 1960 to 
1965, and 433 per cent for the decade. 

Projections for 1967 are more than 12,000,000 passengers, one-third more than just 
two years ago, and more than a half billion pounds of cargo. 



CRYSTAL BALL GAZING These figures, although impressive, can only give us a short glimpse of what the 

future holds for San Francisco International Airport. A Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration forecast about three years ago estimated air travel growth at an annual 
rate of between five and ten per cent through 1971. 

That estimate can only be considered as conservative inasmuch as the national 
increase in air passengers has averaged more than 10 per cent annually for several 
years and there are few indications of a decrease in the foreseeable future. The 
trend toward lower fares and advent of a new family of sub-sonic jetliners with 
far greater passenger and cargo capacities give bright hopes for an even greater 
growth rate in coming years. 

Forecasts of traffic growth at SFIA predict that by 1972, just five years away, the 
passenger total will reach the 20,000,000 mark, and air cargo volume of 1,300,- 
000,000 pounds is not impossible. 

Data from airlines and other tenants clearly indicate the total jobs on the Airport 
will be well over 30,000 by 1970 and easily can be approaching the 40,000 mark by 
1975. Related jobs elsewhere in the Bay Area could experience a parallel growth. 
Additional capital investments by the Airport, airlines and other tenants are 
expected to exceed $90,000,000 by 1970 and more than $100,000,000 additionally 
by 1975. 



The present air cargo area 
which will be cleared out to 
make way for the North Pas- 
senger Terminal proposed in the 
Airport Master Plan. 



The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and Airport Management are fully AIRPORT PLANS 
cognizant of the problems ahead. Problems resulting from air traffic growth, new 
and larger "jumbo" sub-sonic jetliners which may transport from 800 to 1,000 
passengers, and the super-sonic jet transports ( SSTs ) expected to be in sendee in 
less than a decade. 

To meet the new and ever greater challenges, the Commission is seeking voter 
approval of a $98,000,000 Airport bond issue in November to carry out proposals 
of the Airport Master Plan. 

The major proposals include: expansion of the parking garage to an 8,000-car 
capacity; development of a North Passenger Terminal; creation of a 250-acre Air 
Cargo Center; improved access to and exit from the Airport; increase capacity of 
the Airport's roadways system, and improvements to aircraft taxiways and run- 
ways. 

All costs of the bond proposal can be met from Airport revenues. The Airport has 
been financially self-supporting for 10 years with revenues more than adequate to 
pay all operation and debt service costs. Any excess funds have been retained for 
improvement of existing facilities. 




This antennae on the roof of the 
Central Terminal Building re- 
ceives weather data from three 
orbiting satellites. The data is of 
great assistance to the Weather 
Bureau in making tceather ana- 
lyses. 



Jet engine tests requiring high 
speed run-ups are conducted at 
a prescribed point of San Fran- 
cisco International Airport near- 
ly two miles from the closest 
dwelling. This procedure aids 
greatly in reducing possible jet 
sound nuisance to adjacent 
areas. 




SOUND ABATEMENT An enormous effort to control aircraft noise near airports has for years occupied 

many of the best engineering minds in the aircraft and air transportation in- 
dustries. Many millions of dollars have been expended. The airlines, federal 
agencies, airport operators and pilots have, from the start of the jet age, combined 
their best talents in an unending endeavor to find better methods of minimizing 
jet noise over communities adjacent to airports. Manufacturers of aircraft, work- 
ing with the airlines and federal agencies, have developed constantly improved 
jetliners with quieter engines which have eased the airport noise situation con- 
siderably. 



SOUND ABATEMENT With the coming of the jet age in 1960, several communities surrounding San 
CENTER Francisco International Airport were subjected to a new noise from overflying 

jets. To improve the jet noise situation, a Sound Abatement Center was organized 
with membership from all airlines, the Air Transport Association, the Air Line 
Pilots Association, San Francisco International Airport, and San Francisco Public 
Utilities Commission. 

During the past six years the Sound Abatement Center has taken many steps to 
reduce or eliminate jet noise with the result that this airport was not included in 
the list of major airports in the United States placed under a jet noise study by 
President Johnson's panel headed by White House Science Advisor, Donald F. 
Horning. 



PREFERENTIAL RUNWAY The Sound Abatement Center and the Federal Aviation Agency have developed 
SYSTEM CREATED a preferential runway system to avoid takeoffs and landings over inhabited areas 

whenever wind and weather conditions permit. As a result over 95 per cent of 
jet landings at San Francisco International Airport are made from over San Fran- 
cisco Bay. Annually the majority of takeoffs, under the perferential runway system 
are made over water, instead of over populated areas. 



A major factor in keeping the 
jet noise annoyance at a min- 
imum is the use of preferential 
runways when weather condi- 
tions permit. The average run- 
ways usage over a year period 
on a percentage basis, clearly 
shows that just slightly more 
than a third of all jet aircraft 
take-offs are over land and/or 
residential areas. 



-JET AIRCRAFT 
DEPARTURES 



At the instance of the Sound Abatement Center, and with the cooperation of the SOUND ABATEMENT 
airlines and their pilots, aircraft now take off from San Francisco International FLIGHT PROCEDURES 
Airport utilizing refined procedures of engine and flap settings designed to min- 
imize the jet noise over neighboring communities. Approximately 2,000 jet pilots 
operating these planes are cooperating in this program. Two-thirds of these pilots 
reside in the Bay Area. 



The first generation of jet engines of the water injection type, which were rela- FAN ENGINES 
tively noisy, have been replaced to a great degree by the newer fan jet and other 
type engines making less noise and having a much higher rate of climb, thus 
reducing the noise over populated areas. 



The airlines of the United States have spent some $73,000,000 for sound suppres- SOUND SUPPRESSORS 
sors which are installed on their jet engines, thus making commercial jets using 
San Francisco International Airport much quieter than military planes using the 
same engines. In addition, the airlines have accepted a $36,000,000 annual pen- 
alty (lost revenue) because suppressor-equipped engines require more fuel and 
added operating cost to maintain the equipment. 



In the interest of sound abatement, air lines using San Francisco International TRAINING FLIGHTS 
Airport transferred their flight training programs to other airports in northern 
California. Last year San Francisco based airlines made over 20,000 training 
landings at other air fields in order to relieve the Peninsula area from the noise of 
more than 50 training flights per day. These training programs, at remote air- 
ports, cost the companies considerably more than would have been the case if 
San Francisco International Airport were used. 



AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS 
LANDINGS AND TAKE-OFFS BY YEARS 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 




RUNWAY LENGTHENING Over $8,300,000 has been spent or contracted for by San Francisco Public Utilities 

Commission for the extension of Runways 28L, 28R, some half mile each farther 
out into San Francisco Bay, and Runway 1R some 1,000 feet into the Bay, thus 
making it possible for jets to achieve higher altitude on takeoffs over neighboring 
communities with resultant reduction in jet noise. 



MAINTENANCE NOISE The Sound Abatement Center has arranged for a curfew on maintenance noise 

between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. If between these hours it is necessary to run tests on 
jet engines, the airlines will tow the aircraft out to a runup point located some 
two miles from the nearest residences. 



THE FUTURE San Francisco International Airport, because of its optimum location serving 
national and international airways, its progressive management, its fine relation- 
ship with the world's leading airlines, and the communities of San Mateo County 
and San Francisco, and with the demonstrated cooperation of the Federal Aviation 
Agency, the Sound Abatement Center, Air Line Pilots Association, Air Transport 
Association, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and officials of San Mateo 
County and cities surrounding San Francisco International Airport, seems destined 
to continue to be a major factor in the growth and prosperity of the San Francisco 
Bay Area. 



For additional information please address : 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
Public Relations Office 
San Francisco, California 94128 



Grateful acknowledgements for assistance in compiling much of the data contained 
in this booklet are due to: 

San Francisco Public Utilities Commission 

Federal Aviation Administration 

Air Transport Association 

Airline Pilots Association 

Sound Abatement Center 

San Mateo County Development Assn. 

19 Airlines and other major tenants of San Francisco International Airport. 



AIRLINES SERVING 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ARE 



Air California 
American Airlines 
British Overseas Airways 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines 
Delta Air Lines 
Flying Tiger Line 
Japan Air Lines 
Lufthansa German Airlines 
National Airlines 
Pacific Air Lines 
Pacific Southwest Airlines 
Pan American World Airways 
Philippine Air Lines 
Qantas Empire Airways 
SF&O Helicopter Airlines 
Trans World Airlines 
United Air Lines 
West Coast Airlines 
Western Airlines